Journal

Radikale Aneignung

Gleich drei Varianten von Appropriation Art werden derzeit ausgestellt, angefangen bei der postmodernen Ikonoklastin schlechthin, Elaine Sturtevant. Read more on taz.

5 Art Accounts to Follow on Instagram Now

Radical, historical and hysterical, her Instagram is a universe of technical images, like the wild, grotesque “Uterus Man” (2013) or the delirious “Lu Yang Delusional Mandala” (2015), featuring the artist as a post-gender humanoid who seems to achieve mortality through digital means. Where her installations are enveloping and exhilarating, her Instagram feed offers snippets of her manic and visionary work. Read now on The New York Times.

Sturtevant – Appreciating the appropriation applicably

Sturtevant (1924–2014) is an American artist whose iconic series Warhol Flowers (1970) is in full bloom at the gallery Société in Berlin. The small and dainty, variously colorful silkscreen works-on-canvas hang on the white walls like postage stamps. Yet the simple, clean hanging of the exhibition (which in my view is perfect) reveals nothing of the convolution the works involve. Maybe it would not do to mount an exhibition in an elaborate setting for a complex artist: These are the silkscreen series of Andy Warhol “by” Sturtevant. Read more on Talking About Art.

As MoMA Rehangs a Full Third of Its Collection, the Art of the Internet Age Takes Center Stage

Emblematic of the museum’s endeavor overall is gallery 209, a mini-exhibition titled “Search Engines” on the second floor, which houses art from 1970 to the present. Including works from the first two decades of the new millennium, it focuses on the historic 1998 launch of Google. It studies the way that artists have responded to the internet’s penetration into every aspect of our lives, not only with new-media works like Petra Cortright’s VVEBCAM (2007), which was created for YouTube and is on view at the museum for the first time, but also with handcrafted pieces that react to our new reality, such as Gabriel Kuri’s 2005 piece Untitled (Superama II), a woven, wall-hung work that reproduces a receipt from a Mexican department store. Read more on artnet news.

Lu Yang Destroys Self in Motion Capture Performance

Lu Yang’s motion capture performance Delusional World (2020) was live streamed from Chronus Art Centre in Shanghai this week. Presented by ACMI, Arts Centre Melbourne, AsiaTOPA, and The Exhibitionist, the event was scheduled to take place in Federation Square, Melbourne, but was shifted online due to the pandemic. Read more on Ocula.

In the galleries: Referencing the revered Washington colorists and beyond

Most of the artists who show at Von Ammon Co. have a love-hate relationship with contemporary American advertising and marketing. Timur Si-Qin shares their fascination, but not their cynicism. His “Take Me, I Love You” borrows Madison Avenue’s tools to make a pitch that’s earnest and even cosmic. The New York-based artist’s photography and sculpture show touts “New Peace,” billed by the gallery as “a new form of spirituality in the face of global pandemics, climate change and biodiversity collapse.” Read more on The Washington Post.

Seeking sanctuary

New-wave artist Lu Yang from Shanghai invites visitors to explore heaven and hell in the video game The Great Adventure Of The Material World. This digital fantasy features cyberpunk noir, mind-bending technologies and neuroscientific religion in finding the way to nirvana. Read more on Bangok Post.

Best Practices: Lu Yang’s Otherworldly Avatars Imagine New Possibilities for the Body

Five years ago, Lu Yang made a genderless rendering of himself the protagonist of Lu Yang Delusional Mandala, a 2015 video in which the artist’s avatar wears a baseball cap and dances through a computer-generated version of outer space. Not that the figure is carefree. The viewer is given to understand that there is a tumor in the avatar’s brain, and at times it seems to be in pain. At various points in the 16-minute piece, it is probed by diagnostic machines. The avatar dies and lives again numerous times, and ultimately ends up suspended in an enormous mandala. Read more ARTnews.

Fridericianum to be illuminated with video about USA elections

The oldest public museum in Germany, the Fridericianum, will reflect the dark mood of chaos in the year leading up to the United States’ presidential election. On November 3 in Kassel, Trisha Baga’s commissioned eight-minute film, Hope (2020), will be projected onto the front facade of the Fridericianum, coinciding with the US vote, which the work highlights in addition to other global affairs. Read more on Art Asia Pacific.

Digital und emotional: Gesellschaftliche Gefühlszustände in 3D

Passend zur Jahreszeit fühlt man sich in den Kontext einer Halloweenparty versetzt, die einer US-amerikanischen Highschoolserie entsprungen sein könnte: der Raum sparsam beleuchtet, die Wände im dunklem Violett, mit abgewetzten Tapetendetails, davor großformatige Portraits in leicht kitschigen, ebenfalls lilafarbenen Rahmen. Die Assoziation ist nicht weit gefehlt, denn die Medienkünstlerin Bunny Rogers (*1990 in Houston, Texas) bedient sich in ihren Arbeiten der Symbolsprache und Ästhetik von Cartoons, Videospielen und frühen Websites – einer Medienwelt also, mit der all jene, die um die Jahrtausendwende aufwachsen durften, bestens vertraut sind. Read more on art-in-berlin.de.

Hello World, bye-bye Bahnhof

Die unheimliche Stimmung scheint sich auch auf den Hamburger Bahnhof zu legen, wo er sein Büro in den letzten Jahren unterhielt und bis zum Monatsende gepackt haben muss. Wer das Museum für Gegenwart besucht, gelangt nach der Buchhandlung in die Ausstellung von Bunny Rogers, ein junger Superstar aus den Vereinigten Staaten. Read more on Der Tagesspiegel.

Cloud Nothings – “Am I Something”, directed by Lu Yang

“I became familiar with Lu Yang’s work through her exhibit in Cleveland, Ohio at MOCA Cleveland in 2017,” Cloud Nothings frontman Dylan Baldi said in a statement. “I was really drawn to her approach of tying religion into gender and various gendered bodily functions. The animation style of some of her work is also exactly on my wavelength—like a psychedelic genderless Sims game. Very excited to be able to work with Lu!”. Read more on ourculture.

Der dankbare Tote. Ein Studiobesuch bei Tina Braegger

Bunt, laut, schrill – tanzen sie über die Leinwände. Marschieren mal mit Mustern ausgemalt, dann als leere Hülle in den Grenzen des Bildes. Es sind variierte Formen fröhlich aus der Bildfläche lächelnder Bären, die die Schweizer Künstlerin Tina Braegger überlebensgroß mit Pinsel und Farbe zum Leben erweckt. Pünktlich zum Berliner Gallery Weekend zeigt Braegger eine neue Serie des nicht unschuldigen Motivs in psychedelischen Farbgemengen. Read in German on gallerytalk.net.

Im Zeichen des Bären, jedenfalls

Einen „langen, trockenen Weg“ sieht Daniel Wichelhaus vor sich. Der Geschäftsführer der Galerie Société malt sich aus, wann das „Sparschwein leer sein dürfte, dann wird es spannend“. Zunächst einmal kontert er alle Skepsis mit dem Umzug nach Charlottenburg in noble Räume, wo er die 1985 in Luzern geborene Tina Braegger in sein Programm aufnimmt. Read in German on FAZ.

THE INTERVIEW IN|DEEDS: Tina Braegger

Kunst war für mich eine Möglichkeit, mich auszudrücken, die in meinem Umfeld glücklicherweise nicht auf Unverständnis stiess. Grundsätzlich hat man ein bestimmtes individuelles Mass an Energie und um das Dringendste kümmert man sich zuerst. Read in German on DEEDS.

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