Journal

The artist Bunny Rogers is making the macabre optimistic

“I feel like I have a soul now,” Bunny Rogers said on the phone from Frankfurt, days after the opening of her exhibition Pectus Excavatum at the Museum für Moderne Kunst. Following her 2017 Whitney solo exhibition Brig Und Ladder, which served to complete a trilogy of installations about the Columbine High School massacre, the American-born artist retreated into a year-long hermitage. Read more on Interview.

Bunny Rogers discusses “Pectus Excavatum” at MMK Frankfurt

Questioning how much we think we know, especially within a broader consideration of animal intelligence, is one of the main focuses of the show at MMK Frankfurt. I define intelligence as sensitivity, and in those terms, animals such as squid, octopi, and whales are indicative of the extreme sensory capabilities that we’ve barely scraped the surface of. Read and watch on ARTFORUM.

Petra Cortright at 1301PE

Cortright’s choice of subject lands on the perfect place along the art history spectrum for this conversation. The dozen or so works are variations on the floral still life genre, and “Lucky Duck Lights Out,” the exhibition title, references two varieties of dahlia, the former a sunny yellow and the latter, a velvety scarlet(…) Read more on ARTILLERYMAG.

Mortality in the digital age: the many deaths of Lu Yang

Lu Yang videos burn themselves onto our retinas. Glaring and heady, they construct narratives of self-mutilation, which are used by the artist as a process of enlightenment. Both Yang’s best-known video installations, Delusional Mandala (2015) and Delusional Crime and Punishment (2016), tell the story of a bizarrely manufactured human figure (a 3D genderless simulation of Yang herself) stuck in limbo between a life of synthetic potential and its inevitable condemnation. Read more on Art Basel.

Technofuturistic imagery of video artist Lu Yang

Lu might be driven by a similar desire, joining the dots between Buddhism, neuroscience and biology in an oeuvre that resembles a manga franchise populated by a psychotic cast of gods, demons and cyborgs – as well as the artist herself. While Capra’s new-age tome sought to attune ‘modern’ scientific minds in the West to the ‘ancient wisdom’ of Eastern spirituality, Lu’s sciencefiction approach to religious iconography is a joyously accelerationist affair, fusing inquiries into consciousness and control in a dizzying cosmological cocktail. Read the full feature in Frieze Magazine.

Visit Bunny Rogers’ installation at the New Museum as part of “The Art Happens Here: Net Art’s Archival Poetics”

”The Art Happens Here: Net Art’s Archival Poetics” features sixteen works from throughout net art history, showcasing a wide range of forms—websites, software, sculpture, graphics, books, and merchandise—while offering a space for considering the internet as social process, material infrastructure, and lived experience. Among the works on view is Sister Unn’s (2012), an installation by Bunny Rogers and Filip Olszewski based on a mysterious storefront in Queens that led passersby to an equally enigmatic website, exemplifying the links between real and virtual space. On view at New Museum, New York.

Portrait Lu Yang, The Universe Is On Fire by Harry Burke

“Floating in a purplish, cloudy outer space, the avatar undergoes stereotaxy, a high-tech form of minimally incisive brain surgery, which gives her the consciousness and form of a god. But as the body’s audacious mutability is revealed, so is its fragility: the artist succumbs to death, and is whisked to the afterlife in an ornate, dust-churning hearse. A cartwheeling, distorted sound track by DJ Cavia666 escorts the video to its end…”

This text appears in Spike #58. You can buy it in Spike online shop.

How the military, a marathoner, and the relentless march of capitalism turned protein bars into an unlikely American staple.

Two cofounders of the algae-bar start-up Nonfood, artist Sean Raspet and writer Lucy Chinen, tell me that they see the protein-bar format as a way to introduce consumers to algae as an ecologically sustainable staple food.“In some of the ideas we had, when we were doing five things that were new, it got to be so people wouldn’t know what to do with it,” says Raspet, who worked as a flavorist for the notorious liquid-meal start-up Soylent before starting Nonfood. Read more on Topic.com.

The Making of Rhizome’s Net Art Anthology: Petra Cortright’s VVEBCAM

Just as Cortright used the default effects that came with her camera, she also treated YouTube metadata as a readymade. She copied a string of terms often used by spam accounts on the platform, which were designed to draw in viewers who were trawling for titillating or offensive material, and pasted it into the keyword field for her own video. This led to numerous angry and confused commenters, with whom Cortright often engaged in all-out flame wars. Read more on Google Art and Culture.

Die Hölle brennt in Eiseskälte

Mit drei Ausstellungen ist Bunny Rogers in ihrer Heimat USA bekannt geworden, darin beschäftigte sie sich mit dem Columbine-Schulmassaker von 1999, die Künstlerin war zu diesem Zeitpunkt Mitte 20. Jetzt ist sie ein paar Jahre älter, derzeit Gastprofessorin an der Städelschule und hat für den besonderen Ort Zollamt des Museums für Moderne Kunst eine Installation erarbeitet, in der es zum ersten Mal überhaupt nicht um Columbine geht, wie sie selbst sagt. Read in German on Frankfurter Rundschau.

Reales und Fiktion mischen sich immer mehr

Puh, das muss man erst mal ver­dau­en, was Bun­ny Ro­gers meint: Die Er­in­ne­rung an den Lie­b­lings­zei­chen­trick­film ist ge­n­au­so real wie die Er­in­ne­rung an ei­nen to­ten, ge­lieb­ten Men­schen. Ist der To­te et­wa nicht per­sön­li­cher? Read in German on Main-Echo.

Timur Si-Qin: Forgiving Change, 2018 at High Line, New York

Timur Si-Qin (b. 1984, Berlin, Germany) creates artwork that posits advertising and commercial marketing as a result and extension of biology. Across his practice, Si-Qin works to combat essentialism—whether in branding, language, or nature itself. He often builds seemingly organic environments whose underlying industrial structures can be easily seen, thus calling into question the things we take for granted as “natural” or “unnatural.” For the High Line, Si-Qin presents Forgiving Change, aluminum casts of a burned tree branch from Pepperwood Preserve, which was the site of one of the many forest fires that crossed the west coast of North America in 2017.

Goings on about town – Trisha Baga

A motley assortment of enchanting ceramic sculptures fills the first room of Baga’s installation “Mollusca and the Pelvic Floor.” A half-dozen glazed poodle heads accompany melting guitars, volcanic islands, and fossil-like abstractions; two busts—a self-portrait and a deft rendering of RuPaul—house virtual-assistant devices. Read more on New Yorker.

Timur Si-Qin in Living Content Live hosted by Times Square Space, New York

Organized by Living Content in partnership with Times Square Space, Living Content Live is a full day event consisting of talks, presentations, screenings, and performances, by some of the most thought-provoking contemporary artists, writers, and curators. Dealing with topics such as ecology, feminism, technology, and knowledge production, the featured speakers will present unique insights into their practices and their discourses. Read more on Living Content website 

What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week

Trisha Baga’s brand of weirdness draws from science fiction, spiritualism and contemporary oracles like Wikipedia and Alexa, the digital personal assistant. As art, it takes the form of a psychedelic 3-D video installation, ceramic sculptures in various sizes and paintings on lenticular photographs in the show “Mollusca & the Pelvic Floor” at Greene Naftali. Read more on The New York Times.

Petra Cortright Debuts Public Art Installation at Doota Plaza in Seoul

The L.A.-based artist was commissioned by the Seoul shopping center for a new large-scale public art installation, which was unveiled today. Working with Korean creative agency SketchedSpace, which produced the project, Cortright created new digital paintings which “skin” the building’s facade, as well as 17 large flags bearing her designs. Read more on WWD

Trisha Baga’s “Mollusca & The Pelvic Floor”

Trisha Baga’s third exhibition at Greene Naftali is also her most ambitious. “Mollusca & The Pelvic Floor,” like its cosmically hilarious and dizzyingly psychedelic predecessors, features a dazzling and untidy collection of found, handmade, and moving-image works: from doctored lenticular posters of human anatomy to idiosyncratic ceramic representations of everyday objects, all arranged around and within a deliriously complex 3D video installation. Read more on art agenda.

Trisha Baga - Mollusca & The Pelvic Floor TEASER

Watch full version at Greene Naftali

Trisha Baga at Greene Naftali
Mollusca & The Pelvic Floor
September 14 – October 20, 2018

For her third exhibition at Greene Naftali, Mollusca & the Pelvic Floor, Baga presents an installation comprising a wide-ranging landscape of ceramics in varying scales, as well as a new video installation. The exhibition’s eponymous central video examines language, technology, identity, and intimacy, through an expanding and contracting scope that ranges from galactic footage sourced from the sci-fi movie Contact, to video of intimate minutia such as Baga’s toes peeking out from a bathtub, an image echoed in a pair of small ceramic sculptures on the floor.

Colin Lang on Jeanette Mundt at Société, Berlin

The September issue of Texte zur Kunst focuses on Amerika (U.S. America principally): the land, the idea, and all that seems to come with it. What is Amerika today other than a contradiction between brute political reality and a largely fictional self-image, where fiction says as much about fact as “alternative facts” say about the truth? Purchase full online access

Bunny Rogers Interview: Mourning Youth

Watch the praised artist Bunny Rogers (b. 1990) talk about creating autobiographical work that draws from memory and deals with her childhood by archiving her feelings from that time: “You can’t make objective art, it’s going to be subjective.” Louisiana Channel on Vimeo

Art Basel Conversations - Timur Si-Qin and Lu Yang

The Singularity: Virtual Reality and Artificial Intelligence

Virtual reality is increasingly being used as a medium within the parameters of art: a development that connects to the way technology is increasingly shaping the way we live. How are artists engaging with this emergent techno-reality, and what future do they see?

Timur Si-Qin, Artist, Berlin Lu Yang, Artist, Shanghai Kening Zhu, Assistant Professor, School of Creative Media, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Moderated by Victoria Chang, Director of VIVE Arts, HTC, London.

 

 

Neurocore: Lu Yang

Can human beings mutate into we are historically used to call “gods” with the help of advanced technology? The Shanghai based artist discusses her interest in the physiology of the human brain, religious narratives, and the aesthetics of gaming and anime in relation to her hyper-stimulating, arcade-like installations. Read more on Mousse Magazine

YUEN HSIEH X LU YANG

From a young age, I feel that the characters in the anime are easily pretty drawn only a few strokes. How can people be so tired and still look so ugly? I have Chūnibyō illness so it is easy to get into the role when cosplaying. Read and watch on Yuen Hsieh Vimeo

Living Content

Timur Si-Qin and Katja Novitskova in conversation

Katja Novitskova, born in 1984 in Tallinn, is currently based in Berlin, and Timur Si-Qin, born in 1984 in Berlin, is based in New York. Katja and Timur’s long friendship stems from their shared passion for nature and philosophy. Here, in the second issue of Living Content, they reminisce about their beginnings in art, their community spanning Berlin and Amsterdam, and they also discuss their interest in deep time, ecology and evolution. Read more on Living Content.

Kunst aus der Schweiz

Kaspar Müller for Ricola

Kaspar Müller fotografierte eine rote Glaskugel vor einem hochalpinen Panorama. Die Aufnahmen für dieses Bild entstanden in einem Walliser Bergdorf unterhalb der Baumgrenze mit Blick auf den Grande Dent de Veisivi (3418 m ü. M.), den Dent de Perroc (3676 m ü. M.) und den westlich vom Matterhorn gelegenen und von der Kugel verdeckten Dent d’Hérens (4171 m ü. M). Kaspar Müller untersucht mit seinen Arbeiten die Wahrnehmung einer Realität, die selbst schon Bild oder Zitat ist: Populärkultur und Warenwelt halten dafür viele Beispiele bereit, die er in seinen Werken aufgreift und künstlerisch befragt. Download at ricola.ch