Journal

Artvisor’s Frieze New York 2019 Highlights

Lu Yang‘s disorientating and fantastical visions at Société‘s booth also drew crowds who seemed more intent on new discoveries than the standard blue chip material that this year’s fair calendar has supplied the already crowded art world circuit since the start of the year. Read more on Artvisor.

Innocence Impossible: Bunny Rogers

Bunny Rogers’s practice depicts the impossibility of pure innocence. It concerns topics ranging from school shootings to the agency of nonhuman animals, the sexualization of children, and the romanticization of dying young. This essay traces the persistence of these themes through her expansive body of work, focusing on her deployment of cute objects as both material and metaphor. Read the full essay by Emily Watlington on Mousse Magazine.

The 10 Best Booths at Art Basel in Hong Kong

If you’re yearning for sensory overload, head directly to Société’s solo presentation of the young Chinese artist Lu Yang. For the fair, Lu created four films (all 2019) featuring four different characters—half-robots, half-gods—which play on elevated screens, while lightboxes in the same style hang on the walls. Read more on Artsy.

The artist Bunny Rogers is making the macabre optimistic

“I feel like I have a soul now,” Bunny Rogers said on the phone from Frankfurt, days after the opening of her exhibition Pectus Excavatum at the Museum für Moderne Kunst. Following her 2017 Whitney solo exhibition Brig Und Ladder, which served to complete a trilogy of installations about the Columbine High School massacre, the American-born artist retreated into a year-long hermitage. Read more on Interview.

Bunny Rogers discusses “Pectus Excavatum” at MMK Frankfurt

Questioning how much we think we know, especially within a broader consideration of animal intelligence, is one of the main focuses of the show at MMK Frankfurt. I define intelligence as sensitivity, and in those terms, animals such as squid, octopi, and whales are indicative of the extreme sensory capabilities that we’ve barely scraped the surface of. Read and watch on ARTFORUM.

Petra Cortright at 1301PE

Cortright’s choice of subject lands on the perfect place along the art history spectrum for this conversation. The dozen or so works are variations on the floral still life genre, and “Lucky Duck Lights Out,” the exhibition title, references two varieties of dahlia, the former a sunny yellow and the latter, a velvety scarlet(…) Read more on ARTILLERYMAG.

Mortality in the digital age: the many deaths of Lu Yang

Lu Yang videos burn themselves onto our retinas. Glaring and heady, they construct narratives of self-mutilation, which are used by the artist as a process of enlightenment. Both Yang’s best-known video installations, Delusional Mandala (2015) and Delusional Crime and Punishment (2016), tell the story of a bizarrely manufactured human figure (a 3D genderless simulation of Yang herself) stuck in limbo between a life of synthetic potential and its inevitable condemnation. Read more on Art Basel.

Technofuturistic imagery of video artist Lu Yang

Lu might be driven by a similar desire, joining the dots between Buddhism, neuroscience and biology in an oeuvre that resembles a manga franchise populated by a psychotic cast of gods, demons and cyborgs – as well as the artist herself. While Capra’s new-age tome sought to attune ‘modern’ scientific minds in the West to the ‘ancient wisdom’ of Eastern spirituality, Lu’s sciencefiction approach to religious iconography is a joyously accelerationist affair, fusing inquiries into consciousness and control in a dizzying cosmological cocktail. Read the full feature in Frieze Magazine.

Visit Bunny Rogers’ installation at the New Museum as part of “The Art Happens Here: Net Art’s Archival Poetics”

”The Art Happens Here: Net Art’s Archival Poetics” features sixteen works from throughout net art history, showcasing a wide range of forms—websites, software, sculpture, graphics, books, and merchandise—while offering a space for considering the internet as social process, material infrastructure, and lived experience. Among the works on view is Sister Unn’s (2012), an installation by Bunny Rogers and Filip Olszewski based on a mysterious storefront in Queens that led passersby to an equally enigmatic website, exemplifying the links between real and virtual space. On view at New Museum, New York.

Portrait Lu Yang, The Universe Is On Fire by Harry Burke

“Floating in a purplish, cloudy outer space, the avatar undergoes stereotaxy, a high-tech form of minimally incisive brain surgery, which gives her the consciousness and form of a god. But as the body’s audacious mutability is revealed, so is its fragility: the artist succumbs to death, and is whisked to the afterlife in an ornate, dust-churning hearse. A cartwheeling, distorted sound track by DJ Cavia666 escorts the video to its end…”

This text appears in Spike #58. You can buy it in Spike online shop.

How the military, a marathoner, and the relentless march of capitalism turned protein bars into an unlikely American staple.

Two cofounders of the algae-bar start-up Nonfood, artist Sean Raspet and writer Lucy Chinen, tell me that they see the protein-bar format as a way to introduce consumers to algae as an ecologically sustainable staple food.“In some of the ideas we had, when we were doing five things that were new, it got to be so people wouldn’t know what to do with it,” says Raspet, who worked as a flavorist for the notorious liquid-meal start-up Soylent before starting Nonfood. Read more on Topic.com.

The Making of Rhizome’s Net Art Anthology: Petra Cortright’s VVEBCAM

Just as Cortright used the default effects that came with her camera, she also treated YouTube metadata as a readymade. She copied a string of terms often used by spam accounts on the platform, which were designed to draw in viewers who were trawling for titillating or offensive material, and pasted it into the keyword field for her own video. This led to numerous angry and confused commenters, with whom Cortright often engaged in all-out flame wars. Read more on Google Art and Culture.

Die Hölle brennt in Eiseskälte

Mit drei Ausstellungen ist Bunny Rogers in ihrer Heimat USA bekannt geworden, darin beschäftigte sie sich mit dem Columbine-Schulmassaker von 1999, die Künstlerin war zu diesem Zeitpunkt Mitte 20. Jetzt ist sie ein paar Jahre älter, derzeit Gastprofessorin an der Städelschule und hat für den besonderen Ort Zollamt des Museums für Moderne Kunst eine Installation erarbeitet, in der es zum ersten Mal überhaupt nicht um Columbine geht, wie sie selbst sagt. Read in German on Frankfurter Rundschau.

Reales und Fiktion mischen sich immer mehr

Puh, das muss man erst mal ver­dau­en, was Bun­ny Ro­gers meint: Die Er­in­ne­rung an den Lie­b­lings­zei­chen­trick­film ist ge­n­au­so real wie die Er­in­ne­rung an ei­nen to­ten, ge­lieb­ten Men­schen. Ist der To­te et­wa nicht per­sön­li­cher? Read in German on Main-Echo.