Journal

Petra Cortright at 1301PE

Cortright’s choice of subject lands on the perfect place along the art history spectrum for this conversation. The dozen or so works are variations on the floral still life genre, and “Lucky Duck Lights Out,” the exhibition title, references two varieties of dahlia, the former a sunny yellow and the latter, a velvety scarlet(…) Read more on ARTILLERYMAG.

Mortality in the digital age: the many deaths of Lu Yang

Lu Yang videos burn themselves onto our retinas. Glaring and heady, they construct narratives of self-mutilation, which are used by the artist as a process of enlightenment. Both Yang’s best-known video installations, Delusional Mandala (2015) and Delusional Crime and Punishment (2016), tell the story of a bizarrely manufactured human figure (a 3D genderless simulation of Yang herself) stuck in limbo between a life of synthetic potential and its inevitable condemnation. Read more on Art Basel.

Technofuturistic imagery of video artist Lu Yang

Lu might be driven by a similar desire, joining the dots between Buddhism, neuroscience and biology in an oeuvre that resembles a manga franchise populated by a psychotic cast of gods, demons and cyborgs – as well as the artist herself. While Capra’s new-age tome sought to attune ‘modern’ scientific minds in the West to the ‘ancient wisdom’ of Eastern spirituality, Lu’s sciencefiction approach to religious iconography is a joyously accelerationist affair, fusing inquiries into consciousness and control in a dizzying cosmological cocktail. Read the full feature in Frieze Magazine.

Visit Bunny Rogers’ installation at the New Museum as part of “The Art Happens Here: Net Art’s Archival Poetics”

”The Art Happens Here: Net Art’s Archival Poetics” features sixteen works from throughout net art history, showcasing a wide range of forms—websites, software, sculpture, graphics, books, and merchandise—while offering a space for considering the internet as social process, material infrastructure, and lived experience. Among the works on view is Sister Unn’s (2012), an installation by Bunny Rogers and Filip Olszewski based on a mysterious storefront in Queens that led passersby to an equally enigmatic website, exemplifying the links between real and virtual space. On view at New Museum, New York.