SOCIÉTÉ

Bunny Rogers


Installation view, Self Portrait as clone of Jeanne D'Arc, Hamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin, 2020

Installation view, Self Portrait as clone of Jeanne D'Arc, Hamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin, 2020

The multi-faceted practice of American artist and poet Bunny Rogers draws upon a highly personal constellation of television shows, movies, Internet forums, and everyday objects to reflect upon experiences of loss, alienation, intimacy, and community. Working across media, she creates immersive worlds that materialize her own inner universe and uses the hermetic logic of these associations to emotionally connect with the viewer. Rogers’ conceptual landscapes often reference the world of online gaming and the malleable identities endemic to role-playing and fantasy communities. When considered together, her visual and poetic practices can be understood as collages of her real and virtual selves filtered through her supercharged imagination.

Bunny Rogers (b. 1990, Houston) is a visual artist, poet, and performer based in New York. Her work has been exhibited internationally in solo exhibitions at venues including Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz (2020); Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt (2019); Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles (2018); Whitney Museum of Art, New York (2017); and Musée d’Art Moderne, Paris (2015). She has participated in group exhibitions at Boros Collection, Berlin (2022); Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2021); New Museum, New York (2019); Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris (2018); Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek (2017); The Rubell Family Collection, Miami (2016); and Sandretto Re Rebaudengo Foundation, Turin (2015). She is the author of My Apologies Accepted (2014) and Cunny Poem Vol. 1 (2014).

 

Mandy’s Piano Solo in Columbine Cafeteria, 2016.

 

Ms Agony

Société, Berlin, 2020/21

Installation view, Ms Agony, Société, Berlin, 2020

Installation view, Ms Agony, Société, Berlin, 2020

In Ms Agony, Rogers softens and domesticates the chess-board, transforming it into pink and blue squares. With its characters of all classes, intrigues, and actions, the meta-fictional structure of chess has a practically narrative quality. Extending throughout the gallery, Rogers’ chess board provides the substrate for the interplay of longing and desire to unfold. Purple roses encased in cement, sculptural portraits of celebrities as utilitarian household objects, partially-decimated stars from the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and a new series of self-portraits as Joan of Arc are some of the figures that populate the board. Chess is a game of perfect duality, a game of opposites. A time-worn game of skill and strategy, a chess match performs the never-ending cycle of the struggle to survive. While the primary definition of agony denotes a state of intense mental and physical suffering, it also implies a passage from one state into another, the final throes of the struggle before death and the birth of something new.

 
Installation view, Ms Agony, Société, Berlin, 2020/21

Installation view, Ms Agony, Société, Berlin, 2020/21

Installation view, Ms Agony, Société, Berlin, 2020/21

Installation view, Ms Agony, Société, Berlin, 2020/21

Installation view, Ms Agony, Société, Berlin, 2020/21

Installation view, Ms Agony, Société, Berlin, 2020/21

Installation view, Ms Agony, Société, Berlin, 2020/21

Installation view, Ms Agony, Société, Berlin, 2020/21

Installation view, Ms Agony, Société, Berlin, 2020/21

Installation view, Ms Agony, Société, Berlin, 2020/21

Installation view, Ms Agony, Société, Berlin, 2020/21

Installation view, Ms Agony, Société, Berlin, 2020/21

 

Self Portrait as clone of Jeanne D'Arc

Hamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin, 2020

Installation view, Self Portrait as clone of Jeanne D'Arc, Hamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin, 2020

Installation view, Self Portrait as clone of Jeanne D'Arc, Hamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin, 2020

Installation view, Self Portrait as clone of Jeanne D'Arc, Hamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin, 2020

Installation view, Self Portrait as clone of Jeanne D'Arc, Hamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin, 2020

Installation view, Self Portrait as clone of Jeanne D'Arc, Hamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin, 2020

Installation view, Self Portrait as clone of Jeanne D'Arc, Hamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin, 2020

Hamburger Bahnhof is presenting Bunny Rogers’s installation Self Portrait as clone of Jeanne D’Arc. In her works Bunny Rogers plays with ideas of identity and deals with sensitivity and vulnerability as well as friendship and marginalisation. She is often inspired by characters from television series, video games and the internet. In her 15-part, large-format series Self Portrait as clone of Jeanne D’Arc (2019), Rogers adapts the figure of Joan of Arc from the animation series Clone High, in which a school is populated by clones of historical figures. In the role of Joan of Arc’s alter ego, the artist presents herself in various situations in these images with their allusions to everyday life and popular culture, transforming the exhibition space into an atmospheric stage of emotions.

 
 

Kind Kingdom

Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020, curated by Thomas D. Trummer

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

For its first exhibition in 2020 Kunsthaus Bregenz is presenting the American artist Bunny Rogers. The unadorned concrete of Peter Zumthor’s renowned building provides an ideal setting for Roger’s work, since she not infrequently invites her viewers into Stygian-like mise-en-scènes. The mood of her work is somber and doleful. Her installations, which generally incorporate music and poetry, are inspired by figures from the Internet, television series, and video games. The symbolism of the world of consumer goods and the entertainment industry, customarily presented as one that is both safe and profit-oriented, is inverted, becoming equivocal, profound, and melancholic. Rogers plays with identities in making series of portraits of herself that are ultimately 3D models of television characters. She does not present herself as a winner in such works, but rather as vulnerable, capable of suffering, and abandoned.

Bunny Rogers planned expansive installations across all four floors of Kunsthaus Bregenz, the various scenarios and prevailing atmosphere being inspired by American funerals. A lawn is being laid in one space, a shower sprinkling water from the ceiling, the whole recalling shower rooms in an American school. Elsewhere visitors encounter roses cast in concrete. Soil, rubbish, and withered flowers become metaphors for the poetic and painful, beauty and transience – an art that does not shy away from the eerie, reminding each of us of our own responsibilities. It is a memorial, “objective art is impossible,” according to Bunny Rogers.

A central subject in her work are the deliberations in the aftermath of the 1999 mass shooting at Columbine High School in Littleton, USA, in which fifteen people were murdered, including twelve students, one teacher, and the two perpetrators. Bunny Rogers choreographs spaces evoking the school but which become atmospheric tableaus, transforming KUB into a unique site that is not merely theatrical, but also a critical and political one interrogating the present.

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Installation view, Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, 2020

Bunny Rogers on her exhibition and works presented at Kunsthaus Bregenz.

 

Sanctuary

Performa 19 Biennial, New York, 2019

Sanctuary, Performa 19 Biennial, New York, 2019

Sanctuary, Performa 19 Biennial, New York, 2019

Sanctuary, Performa 19 Biennial, New York, 2019

Sanctuary, Performa 19 Biennial, New York, 2019

Bunny Rogers transformed the common spaces of a public high school—hallways, gyms, and the auditorium—into a living installation composed of sculpture, light, special effects, and performers. Rogers dissects how her own internal world was shaped by the media consumption of her youth in the late 1990s and 2000s, exploring contemporary adolescent experience in today’s highly mediatized digital world, to analyse how individual and collective memory are shaped. Referencing the aesthetics of animated television shows and video games, Rogers created an uncanny environment that is at once both familiar and magically surreal.

The audience made their way through darkened hallways, evoking Silent Hill or The Walking Dead, only to find themselves drawn to sounds emanating from the glowing auditorium. There they witnessed a live rehearsal of a talent show, inspired by the MTV animated series Clone High, performed by artist friends and collaborators from Rogers's own life. Akin to the experience of today’s media consumption, the audience had the freedom to come and go as they please, digging through the various layers of artifice to create their own associations, experiences, and ultimately memories.

 

Self-portrait as Clone of Jeanne d’Arc

Art Basel Unlimited, 2019, curated by Gianni Jetzer

Installation view, Self-portrait as Clone of Jeanne d’Arc, Art Basel Unlimited, 2019

Installation view, Self-portrait as Clone of Jeanne d’Arc, Art Basel Unlimited, 2019

With Self-portrait as Clone of Jeanne d’Arc Bunny Rogers moves beyond the confines of the definition of self-portraiture. In a bold gesture near erasure, Rogers removes her own image as subject to replace it with a serial portrait of her adopted persona – the angsty Joan of Arc from MTV’s cult hit Clone High animation series which aired between 2002–2003. Blown up to massive proportions, Roger’s serial self-portrait features her alter ego in 15 varied positions and situations, including references from both, her personal life and pop culture.

Using the cartoon character as a surrogate of herself, Rogers spins a web of associations that are both subjective and relatable. In her practice, Rogers often references the world of online gaming and the malleable identities endemic to role-playing and fantasy communities to investigate themes of alienation, violence, desire, and elastic notion of self present in contemporary life of a mediated society. Using her character as a proxy, the artist also reflects on the complexity of adolescent femininity with angst, ferocity, desire, and narcissism being its intrinsic components – the latter accentuated by the decision to augment the images.

Rogers posits Self Portrait as Clone of Jeanne d’Arc as a continuing act of masquerading. The work underscores Rogers’ conviction that gloom can function productively as a commitment to drama and that viewing life as theatre creates a detachment that allows one “to process an otherwise crushing environment of extremes.”

 
Self Portrait as clone of Jeanne d'Arc (Green Ribbon Joan), 2019, Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g, Silver plated artist frame, black silver, 200 x 163 x 7 cm, 78 1/2 x 64 1/2 x 3 in

Self Portrait as clone of Jeanne d'Arc (Green Ribbon Joan), 2019, Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g, Silver plated artist frame, black silver, 200 × 163 × 7 cm, 78 1/2 × 64 1/2 × 3 in

Installation view, Self-portrait as Clone of Jeanne d’Arc, Art Basel Unlimited, 2019

Installation view, Self-portrait as Clone of Jeanne d’Arc, Art Basel Unlimited, 2019

Installation view, Self-portrait as Clone of Jeanne d’Arc, Art Basel Unlimited, 2019

Installation view, Self-portrait as Clone of Jeanne d’Arc, Art Basel Unlimited, 2019

 

PECTUS EXCAVATUM

Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt, 2019, curated by Susanne Pfeffer

Installation view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Installation view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

The real constitutes itself by permanently overlapping with the symbolic and the imaginary. The relative emphasis assigned to the relationships between each of these three elements depends on the individual as well as on his or her presence. In the work of Bunny Rogers, affect, experience, identification and community, fiction and reality, imagination and physical presence merge into a present subject whose altered perception represents an entire generation.

We have little knowledge about the invertebrate beings in the pitch-black depths of the oceans; all the wilder have we imagined them for centuries. Giant squids, for example, have never before been seen in their own habitat, only debilitated and confused in harbors or dead on beaches or in the stomachs of sperm whales. As studies of smaller squids show, their sensoria and their brains are highly sensitive, their perception finely discriminating. Their eyes — extremely responsive owing to the relatively low degree of light loss — have insights into the abysses of the seas that remain hidden to us.

In her exhibition Pectus Excavatum, the American artist Bunny Rogers is creating a landscape that subtly intertwines inside and outside, mountain peaks and ocean depths, thus exposing the framework of our conceptions of nature — as precise as they are oversimplified — in which knowledge and experience are inseparably linked with the imagination. Smells give rise to memories, hands freeze in ice. All elements are situated on the boundary between naturalism and fiction; they are both physically present and digital, both experiential space and two- dimensional image.

 
Installation view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Installation view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Installation view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Installation view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Installation view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Installation view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Installation view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Installation view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Installation view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Installation view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Detail view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Detail view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Detail view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Detail view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Detail view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

Detail view, PECTUS EXCAVATUM, Zollamt, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Frankfurt, 2019

 

Brig Und Ladder

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017, organized by Elisabeth Sherman, assistant curator and Margaret Kross, curatorial assistant

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

Installation view, Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017

 

Inattention

Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

I feel like I’ve revealed something private when I’m the most specific about my feelings. So rather than trying to talk about something broad in a broad way, you can talk about something broad in a hyper-specific way.

Bunny Rogers
Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

Installation view, Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles, 2018

 

Being There

Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, 2017, curated by Mathias Ussig Seeberg

Installation view, Being There, Louisiana Museum, Humlebaek, 2017

Installation view, Being There, Louisiana Museum, Humlebaek, 2017

Our lives are increasingly influenced by digital technologies and as a result the perception and concept of body, machine, life,death, sociality, isolation, nature and time are changing and taking on new meanings. At the same time, the notion that there is a physical world that is real, and a digital world that is unreal, seems to be rapidly breaking down.

Bunny Rogers in this exhibition is engaged in exploring how these changes affect the way we live with each other and ourselves, and how we navigate among the ruins of an old world and the building blocks for a new one.

In the exhibition the physical and the digital intermingle. There is no clear distinction between where one ends and the other begins. Perhaps our existence right now can best be described as permanently having a foot in both camps – a state of simultaneous presence and absence, as indicated by the title, BEING THERE.

Bunny Rogers erects a self-initiated memorial to a dead high school student. She creates an image of a collapsed reality between a physical and a virtual existence by linking a one-dimensional comic-strip universe with a number of objects in detailed craftsmanship. The work has been created for the exhibition.

 
Installation view, Being There, Louisiana Museum, Humlebaek, 2017

Installation view, Being There, Louisiana Museum, Humlebaek, 2017

Installation view, Being There, Louisiana Museum, Humlebaek, 2017

Installation view, Being There, Louisiana Museum, Humlebaek, 2017

Installation view, Being There, Louisiana Museum, Humlebaek, 2017

Installation view, Being There, Louisiana Museum, Humlebaek, 2017

 

Columbine Cafeteria

Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

My last show at Société was Columbine Library in 2014. I knew early on there would be a second part. I wanted the two main settings where the 1999 Columbine High School shooting took place to be acknowl- edged. But the ideas needed to be spaced out. I wanted it to be a subsequent experience, even if you didn't know about the first show or didn't see it.

I think of the library as being slow and dark, filled with obstacles. That's also how it looks in police photos. The cafeteria was open and well-lit, with tons of people and bombs hidden in duffel bags in plain sight. The cafeteria was more confusing. There's not the same closure as in the library, where Dylan and Eric commit- ted suicide.

The first show referenced characters from two TV series that I watched when I was younger: Joan of Arc from Clone High and Gaz from Invader Zim. I identified with them. I think of them as being each other's sisters. They are both filled with anger. For Joan, it was complicated. The reality of hatred is that it's often self-hatred. Joan expresses anger toward the person that she loves, so you wonder about whether it was love or hate, and about her capacity to love. I paired Joan and Gaz with Dylan and Eric, in part because I wanted to ask: What does female violence look like? How is it enacted? It's usually just internalized forever.

In this show, the characters, the time, the temperature, and the things in the space have changed. Though Elliott Smith is still present. The project continues to serve as a memorial to him. And furniture still functions as a vessel of history. The chairs, tables, and bookshelves at Columbine experienced the events that happened and held onto them.

In the Snowflake Special episode of Clone High, Joan becomes friends with a new character, who is unnamed, but who we understand to be Mandy Moore. At first, Joan is hostile to Mandy the same way she is to Cleo. In that way, her internalized misogyny is represented and questioned. But there's finally a break when Mandy shows Joan the true meaning of Snowflake Day, which is appreciating friends and supporting one another. They go to a party where people are drinking alcohol, which is rare for cartoons. With tears in her eyes, Joan calls Mandy an angel. I've sometimes felt that way about female friends.

I was talking recently with my friend Leo about why I love things from my past more. Maybe it's because you can't love new things the same way that you loved things when you were younger, so you come to love new things through people, if you care about those people. The media makes it easy to love new things, but it's actually closer to addiction. Loving people is hard.

The media leads to complicated feelings of sympathy and empathy. I have never been to Columbine, but thWe media made a big impact on me, and now I have strong feelings about it. Things like the internalized misogyny and alcohol abuse that I saw in the form of a cartoon were nevertheless part of the culture around me. In some ways, I think cartoons and theatre are good ways to talk about things like that. I don't want to actually transport people to these places. They anyway have a place in our collective memory, which leads to subjective mourning.

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Installation view, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Details, Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin, 2016

Bunny Rogers - Société Berlin
 

Columbine Library

Société, Berlin, 2014

Installation view, Columbine Library, Société, Berlin, 2014

Installation view, Columbine Library, Société, Berlin, 2014

Columbine Library was Bunny Rogers’s first exhibition at Société. It takes as a backdrop the Columbine High School massacre, which occurred in Colorado, USA, on April 20, 1999. That school shooting, which left 15 dead and 24 injured, resulted in a media frenzy. Fear spread across the country, as did doubts about a culture that creates a spectacle out of vio- lence and the use of firearms, to the point of normalizing them. Many wanted answers about what motivated the perpetrators, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold. What emerged were portraits of disturbed teenage boys – as well as sobering insights into the pains of adolescence and the trauma of being in high school.

In the media, Harris was portrayed as deranged, and Klebold as prone to depression. They were dehumanized, described as monsters. Psychologically, they couldn’t be normal at all; they had to be aberrations, come untethered from social bonds. Any statement about identifying with them was taboo, repressed, tantamount to homicidal or suicidal tendencies, impossible to reconcile with the status quo that so many had put faith in, that was supposed to keep kids safe and alive and in school.

But the culture industry – the media included – thrives on the capacity of spectator-consumers to identify with the representations that it generates and regenerates. And there’s a kind of unspoken romance to tragic cases in particular, an attraction to the pain of others, an idolization of those who die young (actors, musicians, artists; self-inflicted or not). Difficult though it may be to believe, that’s been the case with Harris and Klebold, too: Rogers discovered a subculture of teenage girls who obsess over them, using the Internet as a forum to express their empathy with the shooters as well as a sexual attraction to them. Not only does this challenge the media’s portraits of Harris and Klebold, it in fact forces us to face an inconvenient truth – that a death drive, rage, vulnerability, difficulties expressing oneself and integrating socially, and even a capacity for atrocities are categorically human traits.

Several cultural icons crop up in Columbine Library, setting up a chain of identification always in relation to Rogers herself – the artist, the tie that binds. Perhaps more than we’d like to admit, there’s something that unites the perpetrators of a horrific school shooting, the victims, adolescent girls (so often typecast as innocent, pure, and non-violent), a cartoon of an angst-filled teenage girl, one of a rage-filled girl, a captive killer whale turned violent, a pacifist bull from a children’s book, and a musician who succumbed to addiction and depression. As Rogers, a kind of medium for the subjectivity of the young girl, threads together uncanny representations of these cultural icons, she reveals something intimate about herself. At the same time, she exposes societal norms and cultural memory for what they are: collective and constructed.

Installation view, Columbine Library, Société, Berlin, 2014

Installation view, Columbine Library, Société, Berlin, 2014

Installation view, Columbine Library, Société, Berlin, 2014

Installation view, Columbine Library, Société, Berlin, 2014

Installation view, Columbine Library, Société, Berlin, 2014

Installation view, Columbine Library, Société, Berlin, 2014

Installation view, Columbine Library, Société, Berlin, 2014

Installation view, Columbine Library, Société, Berlin, 2014

Installation view, Columbine Library, Société, Berlin, 2014

Installation view, Columbine Library, Société, Berlin, 2014

Solo Exhibitions

  • 2021

    Ms Agony, Thaddaeus Ropac, Salzburg

  • 2020

    Ms Agony, Société, Berlin

    Self Portrait as clone of Jeanne D’Arc, Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin, Berlin

    Kind Kingdom, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz

  • 2019

    Art Basel Unlimited under the auspices of Société, Basel
    Pectus Excavatum, Zollamt MMK, Frankfurt am Main

  • 2018

    “Watch Snowflakes Get Trampled”, with Edward Shenk, Hotel Art Pavilion, Brooklyn
    Inattention, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles

  • 2017

    Brig Und Ladder, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

  • 2016

    Columbine Cafeteria, Greenspon Gallery,  New York
    WRJNGER, Co-curated by Simon Castets and Hans Ulrich Obrist, Foundation de 11 Lijnen, Oudenburg
    Columbine Cafeteria, Société, Berlin

  • 2015

    jrasjr, Co-Workers, le réseau comme artiste, Musée d’Art Moderne, Paris
    Art Basel Statements under the auspices of Société, Basel

  • 2014

    Columbine Library, Société, Berlin
    Unusuble chair, Important Projects, Oakland

  • 2013

    Afterlife are belong to me, Sandy Brown, Berlin
    Shades of berny, Appendix Project Space, Portland
    If I Die Young, 319 Scholes, New York

  • 2012

    Questions on Ice, Generation Works, Tacoma

Group Exhibitions

  • 2022

    ANOTHER SURREALISM, Denfrie, Kopenhagen

    Boros Collection #4, Boros Collection, Berlin, 2022

  • 2021

    Anne Imhof – CARTE BLANCHE, Palais de Tokyo, Paris

  • 2019

    The Art Happens Here: Net Art’s Archival Poetics, New Museum, New York

  • 2018

    In Tune with the World, Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris
    On Struggling to Remain Present When You Want To Disappear, OCAT Shanghai, Shanghai

  • 2017

    Being There, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek
    Americans 2017, 89plus, Curated by Simon Castets and Hans Ulrich Obrist, LUMA Westbau, Zurich
    moving is in every direction. Environments – Installations – Narrative Spaces, Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin

  • 2016

    Ministerstwo Spraw Wewnętrznych. Intymność jako tekst, Muzeum Sztuki Nowoczesnej, Warsaw
    High Anxiety: New Acquisitions, The Rubell Family Collection, Miami
    Mined Control, as it stands, Los Angeles
    Pure Fiction, Marian Goodman Gallery, Paris
    We Are All Traitors, Hessel Museum of Art, Annandale-on-Hudson

  • 2015

    Unorthodox, The Jewish Museum, New York
    89plus: “Filter Bubble”, Luma Westbau, Zurich
    Anagramma, curated by CURA, Basement, Rome
    The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, YARAT Contemporary Art Centre, Baku
    Welcome You’re in the Right Place, Sandretto Re Rebaudengo Foundation, Turin
    Studio Program Exhibition, Queens Museum, New York
    Does Not Equal, W139, Amsterdam
    A Sentimental Education, Galerie Andreas Huber, Vienna
    Milk Revolution, American Academy, Compiled by CURA, Rome

  • 2014

    Warez, Carl Kostyál, London
    Private Settings, Art after the Internet, Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw
    Today : Morrow, Balice Hertling, New York
    Joan Dark, Western Front, Vancouver
    Significant Others (I am small, it’s the pictures that got big), High Art, Paris
    Fool Disclosure, Henningsen Gallery, Copenhagen
    Art Post-Internet, Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing
    Raster Raster, Aran Cravey, Los Angeles

  • 2013

    Random House, Arcadia Missa, London
    Chambers at The Wrong: New Digital Art Biennale, thewrong.org National #Selfie Portrait Gallery, Moving Image, London
    Minku, Are You Here?, Springsteen, Baltimore
    Mawu-Lisa ii, Courtney Blades, Chicago
    Double Indemnity, Cornerhouse, Manchester
    Lonely Girl, Martos Gallery, New York
    Shades of Berny, Appendix Project Space, Portland
    Uncanny Visions IV, Aux Performance Space, Philadelphia
    Uniforum: A Place of Nonconsequence, Stamp Gallery at UMD, College Park
    Ethira, Arcadia Missa, London
    Institute Bianche, Library +, London
    4., CEO Gallery, Malmö
    Decenter, Abrons Arts Center, New York
    Trū Romance, Picture Menu, New York
    Open Shape, Kompan Playground, Wichita

  • 2012

    Infamous Amplification, hpgrp Gallery, New York
    Sex Life, Bodega, Philadelphia
    Prrrsona, Little Berlin, Philadelphia

  • 2011

    Screen Play, 25 E 13th Street Gallery, New York
    Mawu-Lisa, New Gallery London, London
    GUT FLORA, 25 E 13th Street Gallery, New York

  • 2010

    REAL/LY/FAKE, 25 E 13th Street Gallery, New York

Performances, Readings and Screenings

  • 2020

    Poetry reading, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz

  • 2019

    Performance: Sanctuary, Performa Biennial, New York

  • 2018

    Poetry reading, with Natalie Shapero, KGB Bar, New York
    Poetry reading, with Aria Hughes-Liebling, David Lewis, New York
    Poetry reading: Conversations in Contemporary Poetics: Precious Okoyomon and Bunny Rogers, Hauser & Wirth, New York
    Poetry reading, Codex,  New York

  • 2017

    Poetry reading: WRJNGER, Swiss Institute, New York
    Poetry reading, Molasses Books, New York
    Poetry reading, The Shed, New York

  • 2016

    Poetry reading: We Are All Traitors, Hessel Museum of Art, Annandale-on-Hudson

  • 2015

    Lecture: Communicating the Archive : Inscription, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg
    Poetry reading, Konstfack University of Arts, Craft and Design, Stockholm
    Poetry reading: Sunday Sessions: It’s Not What Happens, It’s How You Handle It, MoMA PS1, New York
    Poetry reading: Rapport de face à face Hester, New York
    Poetry reading: Performa Poetry Series / What if someone told u you were significant ?, A+E Studios, New York
    Poetry reading: “My Apologies Accepted”, St. Mark’s Bookshop, New York
    Reading and screening, Poetry will be made by all!, Moderna Museet, Stockholm
    Poetry reading: Filter Bubble, Prospectif Cinéma, Centre Pompidou, Paris
    Book Launch and Reading of “My Apologies Accepted”, KGB Bar, New York

  • 2014

    Poetry reading: Wicker Girls, Curated by Rachel Lord, American Medium, New York
    Poetry reading: Columbine Library, Musical accompaniment by Joseph Beers, Société, Berlin
    Poetry reading: Beers and Brigid Mason, Issue Project Room, New York
    Poetry reading: A Striving After Wind, Musical accompaniment by Joey Nikles, Unnameable Books, New York
    Poetry reading: Rumours, Model Projects, Vancouver
    Poetry reading: Otherless Walls, Queens Museum, New York
    Poetry reading: No Petals Left on a Dying Rose, Musical accompaniment by Nathan Whipple, Unnamable Books, New York
    Poetry reading: Hero Systems, Molasses Books, New York
    Poetry reading: To Fade and Spill Out (And Look at Another’s Whole), FJORD, Philadelphia
    Poetry reading: Blackmail Series 1, Mellow Pages Library, New York
    Poetry reading: New Agendas, Macie Gransion, New York

  • 2013

    Poetry reading: Letter to Jane, Gothenburg University, Skogen, Gothenburg
    Poetry reading: Lonely Girl Presents: An Evening of Readings, Martos Gallery, New York
    Performance and poetry reading: gURLS, Transfer Gallery, New York
    Reading: Alone with Other People, LaunchPad, New York
    Performance: I’d give anything for another whiff, Novella Gallery, New York
    Performance: CON/HAL Live-Con, Wayward Gallery, London
    Performance: being(s) connected, Oslo House, London
    Screening: Monkey Town 3, Eyebeam, New York
    Screening: G1RLZ NITE, The DL , New York
    Screening: The Embassy Sweet Sensation Tour, Inkonst, Malmö

  • 2012

    Performance: Company Safety, Silvershed, New York
    Screening: Heavy Meta, Trinity Square Video, Toronto

  • 2011

    Performance: The Real Boob v. 2.0, Double-Double Land, Toronto
    Screening, Boxing Day Presents, Toronto

  • 2010

    Performance, Diane’s Circus, New York